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Walt WhitmanThe Wound Dresser (August 26, 2011)

something has gone horribly wrong 8-p
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LibriVox recording of The Wound Dresser, by Walt Whitman. Read by R. S. Steinberg.

The Wound Dresser is a series of letters written from the hospitals in Washington by Walt Whitman during the War of the Rebellion to The New York Times, the Brooklyn Eagle and his mother, edited by Richard Maurice Burke, M.D., one of Whitman's literary executors. (Summary by R. S. Steinberg)

For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording.

For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org.

M4B format available


This audio is part of the collection: The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
It also belongs to collections: Audio Books & Poetry; Community Audio

Artist/Composer: Walt Whitman
Date: 2011-08-26
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
Keywords: Librivox; audiobook; letters; memoirs; Civil War; hospitals; war wounded; battle wounds; Union; nursing; male nurses

Creative Commons license: CC0 1.0 Universal


Individual Files

Audio Files 128Kbps MP3 Ogg Vorbis 64Kbps MP3
01 - Preface 4.8 MB
2.8 MB
2.4 MB
02 - The Great Army of the Wounded 14.5 MB
8.7 MB
7.3 MB
03 - Life Among Fifty Thousand Soldiers 13.8 MB
8.1 MB
6.9 MB
04 - Hospital Visits - I 19.9 MB
11.4 MB
10.0 MB
05 - Hospital Visits - II 20.0 MB
11.8 MB
10.0 MB
06 - Letters of 1862-3 I-V 20.7 MB
12.1 MB
10.4 MB
07 - Letters of 1862-3 VI-X 22.1 MB
12.9 MB
11.1 MB
08 - Letters of 1862-3 XI-XV 27.2 MB
15.8 MB
13.6 MB
09 - Letters of 1862-3 XVI-XX 20.5 MB
11.7 MB
10.3 MB
10 - Letters of 1862-3 XXI-XXV 28.6 MB
16.2 MB
14.3 MB
11 - Letters of 1862-3 XXVI-XXX 25.2 MB
14.2 MB
12.6 MB
12 - Letters of 1864 I-V 15.9 MB
9.1 MB
8.0 MB
13 - Letters of 1864 VI-X 13.5 MB
7.6 MB
6.8 MB
14 - Letters of 1864 XI-XV 17.9 MB
10.2 MB
9.0 MB
15 - Letters of 1864 XVI-XX 10.0 MB
5.7 MB
5.0 MB
16 - Letters of 1864 XXI-XXV 15.2 MB
8.5 MB
7.6 MB
17 - Letters of 1864 XXVI-XXIX, and Afterword 13.0 MB
7.3 MB
6.5 MB
Information FormatSize
wound_dresser_rs_librivox_files.xml Metadata [file]
wound_dresser_rs_librivox_meta.xml Metadata 2.1 KB
wound_dresser_rs_librivox_reviews.xml Metadata 1.3 KB
Other Files Unknown Archive BitTorrent ItemBitTorrent
wound_dresser_rs_librivox.json 17.2 KB
wound_dresser_rs_librivox_archive.torrent 35.3 KB
wound_dresser_rs_librivox_files.xml 9.5 KB

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Reviews
Average Rating: 4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars

Reviewer: ListeninginChicago - 4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars - December 1, 2011
Subject: Well read look into Whitman's private letters
So much in these letters is routine, with Whitman saying yet again that he had no word from his brother George (who was in the army), asking his mother about family back in Brooklyn, or urging them to write to him. But there are also heartbreaking moments, when we learn that brother Andrew has died, or hear of the sufferings of certain men in the hospital who have horrible, lingering wounds from which they will never recover. I thought it was well worth the time to listen for the insight it gives into the lives of the wounded and to see the effect that ministering for so long among the wounded had on Whitman's physical and mental well-being.

The reader is excellent - his low, somewhat ragged voice seems to match perfectly the pictures of Whitman with his long beard and rough appearance.